Welcome Grandparents raising grandchildren in Oregon

YOU ARE NOT ALONE. LEARN MORE ABOUT US.

 

 

SEE OUR FACEBOOK GROUP!

TIES THAT BIND, a place for you.

Listening. Sharing. Coaching. Helping.

Grandparents raising grandchildren learn new things everyday. We believe in the wisdom of the group. You know more than you think and we are here to help.

NEWS YOU CAN USE

You’re Not Imagining It. Kids are Expensive!

As a grandparent raising grandchildren you are facing unexpected expenses. You probably haven’t added them up since these costs tend to dribble in a little here and a little there. Maybe you don't want to know! But the folks at the UCLA Center for Health Policy...

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The Easiest Way to Get Cash from the IRS

Hundreds of thousands of Oregonians are eligible for the Earned Income Tax Credit but don’t know it – and could be missing out on a tax credit of up to $6,557.  Grandparents raising grandchildren who earned less than $56,000 probably qualify for the tax credit (the...

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Did you know that nearly 3 million grandparents in the US are raising their grandchildren? Here are some of their stories.

TOOLS FOR YOU

The Adolescent Brain

Clues to that mystery.

What if Something Happens to Me?

How you can prepare now for your child(ren).

Resource Guide

For grandparents and other relatives raising children in OR (ADRC).

Legal Guide

For grandparents and other older relatives raising children in OR (DHS).

Searchable Resources – How to Find Oregon Services

Oregon Services in One Place

Help is out there, but it can be hard to find.

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JUST FOR YOU

Photo by Ethan Weil on Unsplash

Kim Stafford, Oregon poet laureate, lives in Portland with his wife and children.

For more, visit his website:

http://www.kim-stafford.com/

An Oregon story

I want to ask us now, we who are both travelers and residents, how do our two stories get healed into one? How do we arrive, finally, in this place, and act simply in the matured character of the Oregon country?

I can only answer this question by telling a story, Lloyd’s story. Lloyd Reynolds, the international citizen of Portland, spent his last days in pain, silent, unable to speak or to write, lying in his hospital bed. On his last day at home, as his wife scurried to pack his suitcase for the hospital, Lloyd made his way outside to the garden, and there she found him on his knees, with a spoon, awkwardly planting the flower bulbs.

“Lloyd,” she said, “you will never see these flowers bloom.”

He smiled at her. “They are not for me,” he said, “they are for you.”

The salmon coming home? They are for you. The calls of wild geese? They are for you. The last old trees? They are for you and your children, to the seventh generation and beyond. They are all blooming into being for you.